Howling Wolf

I have fallen back into one of my earlier ways of painting: I make a mark or a stroke with my brush and then decide what to do next. Each mark I make inspires the next. My idea of the finish painting shifts as the marks and strokes progress. Sometimes I make a leap, that is, a guess about the next brush stroke, without prior inspiration. This works on occasion, and inspires a new direction for the piece but often I learn that I should have stopped painting before that last mark.

Watercolor: Abstract - Howling Wolf

Howling Wolf
Watercolor
16″x12″ 140# Cold Pressed

Metropolis Girl

I began today’s experiment with an arc of yellow. Then I completed the rest of the head skeleton with that same color. I chose an appropriate blue to merge with the yellow to create an acceptable green. I also applied some blue directly, for eyebrow and lip strokes.

I put this aside for a while; when I glanced at it later, it reminded me of the robot girl, Maria from the great silent movie, Metropolis. I think this impression came from the roundness of the head and the curved features of the skeletal scaffolding that I had initially laid down to begin this work.

I like the result and the way the head is surrounded by purple haze.

Watercolor: Portrait - Metropolis Girl

Metropolis Girl
Watercolor Abstract
16″x12″ 140# Cold Pressed Watercolor Block

My Concept of Cloud Formation

I planned to reverse the process of finding faces in clouds by creating faces and hiding them in my painted clouds. It’s harder than it seems. There are a couple of half-formed faces in this abstract, and plenty of half-formed clouds. It seems there is a cut-away, a cross section of a dark cloud that gives one a glimpse of the goings on within the cloud-making machinery of the sky.

Watercolor: Abstract - My Concept of Cloud Formation

My Concept of Cloud Formation
Watercolor
16″x12″ 140# Cold Pressed Watercolor Block

Untitled Portrait

I was reading the first article in Picasso and Portraiture and was reminded that artistic portraiture changed when photography was invented.  Photography supplanted painting as the means of supplying true likenesses of patrons who wished to preserve their likenesses. This freed painters to imbue their portraits with more expression, since they were no longer constrained to produce true-to-life images of their subjects.

The portrait below is an effort to combine emotional elements into a portrait. I wanted to bring an inner feeling to light.

Watercolor: Portrait - Untitled Portrait

Untitled Portrait
Watercolor
9″x12″ 140# Cold Pressed Watercolor Block

Old Palette

My paintings so far this year have a limited range of colors. This happened because I used small bowls of paint to mix my color and I have more than enough for a single work. I don’t like to throw away paint, so I use the left overs on the next sketch. I remembered that I used to use a palette when I was painting regularly.

Watercolor: Abstract - Old Palette

Old Palette
Watercolor
12″x16″ 140# Cold Pressed Watercolor Block

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