Tilt

I spend a lot of time framing a photo in my viewfinder (or on my screen, as is the case when I shoot with my phone).  Sometimes it is difficult to know what to align parallel with the sides of the frame. Today’s photo contains a white line at an angle and a horizontal blue line. The blue line is parallel with the line that defines the sidewalk squares. The yellow line seems to cause visual imbalance. In fact the yellow line is a part of the curb that tapers to parking-lot level to allow easy access for handicapped individuals. It also tapers when viewed from above. Therefore, the orange area appears to be slightly trapezoidal instead of rectangular.

Photography: Abstract - Horizontal Lines and Tilted Planes 101417

Tilt

Balance

The mass of color in this composition is concentrated at dead center. It is surrounded by elaborated parentheses that separate the blues from the outer reds. Surrounding the dark outlines is a virtually concentric lighter outline.

The dark line protruding from the bottom of the central figure is also a balance point.

Normally, I like imbalance, but I like this composition a lot, for some reason.

Watercolor: Abstract - Balance 101617

Balance
12″x9″ 140# Cold Pressed Watercolor Block

Line Design

Some parking lots have double lines that delimit parking spaces. This gives a properly-parked driver comfort that his (or her) door will not be bashed by another parker who pays attention to lines.

The white line with the hairpin turn in the photo below, lies on two different substrates: asphalt and concrete.  The composition is a perfect combination of black, grey and white.

Photography: Abstracted Lines Painted on Asphalt and Concrete 101417

Line Design

 

Rope Trick – Distal End

This composition is a transverse view of the cloud into which the Indian Rope Trickster ascends.

Watercolor: Abstract - Distal End of Rope Trip 101517

Indian Rope Trick – Distal End
12″x9″ 140# Rough Watercolor Block

The region above the clouds appears to be a crucible. It is not clear if said tricksters are aware of what awaits. Perhaps it is a hot meal.

Protector

This composition started with a very quick sketch of a screen image of a movie I was watching. I used no more than 3 or 4 lines of my sketch as a guide to apply my paints. I also used a different range of colors than the dark earth tones, blues and reds of some of my previous abstracts (Umbilicus, Three Red Marks, Blue Ring).

Watercolor: Abstract - Protector 101417

Protector
9″x12″ 140# Cold Pressed Watercolor Block

 

Ramp and Tread

I like this color combination and the arrangement of the rectangles that comprise the visual elements of this photo. Through the lens of my camera, I’ve been editing the views of pavement for a long time. I realize that some of my photos could be blueprints for wonderful abstract paintings. Looking at the photo below, I can just imagine going to work on a large canvas with a palette knife and tubes of oil colors or acrylics, painting wide swaths and areas of color. Watercolors? I can imagine that as well.

Photography: Ramp and Tread 111417

Ramp and Tread

 

Umbilicus

I could have called the study below ‘Number Two’ but in the early stages of development, the earth-tone-colored form reminded me of a fetus. As the design progressed, this form came to resemble the arabic numeral 2.

Watercolor: Abstract - Umbilicus 101317

Umbilicus
12″x9″ 140# Cold Pressed Watercolor Block

I like the design and the colors independent of the visual interpretation.

Iron Works in Dappled Sun

Another street-level photograph. I caught this manhole cover just as the sun was coming through the trees. The matrix of squares that adorns the central portion of this large round plate made it easier to quickly line up a perfectly centered photo (before I got run over).  I like the way the blue reflected light and yellow incident light play on the dark iron.

Photography: Manhole Cover - Johnson Iron Works 100517

Johnson Iron Works

 

A Little Off

This is the fresh-water version of my sewer picture from the other day (Sewer Askew). In that post I rued the misalignment of the entitled sewer cover with the its surrounding concrete in which it was mounted.

Today I saw this water line access cap. As with the sewer cap title, it is also not in alignment with the square-ish lines around it. The good news is, the lines that encircle the water cap are saw marks.  Some workman (or workwoman) with a good sense of order saw the off-kilter water cap and decided to dig it up (and re-align it).

Photography: Water Cap - A Little Off 101117

A Little Off

(They could just twist the cap.)

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