Limit

With today’s composition, I’ve reached the limit of my frisket-and-shake technique, at least for regular patterns (see Netted). The graph-like overlay on the painted area resulted from shaking the liquid masking (frisket) that I applied in closely-spaced parallel lines.

The design includes some very dark areas. A bit of overspill from my ink bottle, poured from standing height caused this (and also some ink-spotted rocks in the back yard). One may notice fine spatter droplets upon looking closely at the lighter areas of this study. I was hoping for more of a recognizable splash effect. An eyedropper would probably have been the appropriate tool for this instead of a pour from the bottle.

Watercolor: Abstract - Limit 061717

Limit
12″x9″ 140# Cold Pressed Watercolor Block

I like the curves in the horizontal lines. They give the impression of bulging space.

Mother and Son Standpipe

Another in a continuing series of fire suppression equipment photographs

I came across this lovely pair of standpipes during one of my morning walks. The thought of kinship between them immediately came to mind.

Photograph: Standpipes, Mother and Son 061317

Mother and Son Standpipes

Mum is standing over the little squirt, as if protecting him.

Netted

I drew narrow traces of masking fluid with a wide-gage hollow applicator. The gage wasn’t narrow enough to allow a smooth outflow. The fluid bunched up and formed a bead at regular intervals across the page. Once I shook the paper at 90 degrees to the direction of the parallel lines, the beads turned into lines oriented at 90 degrees to the other lines.

After the frisket dried, I had some fun spreading different colors around. I used Prussian and ultramarine blues and cadmium red light.

After I peeled off the masking material, I found that my image had been captured by a net.

Watercolor: Abstract - Portrait with Net 061617

Netted
9″x12″ 140# Cold Pressed Watercolor Block

 

Core of the Matter

I took to the back porch with the passion fruit (see posts for previous passion fruit encounters: Passion Fruit Still Lifes, Passion Fruit Revisited). The fruit was so delicate, it almost collapsed in my hand. Even though I had an idea of what the insides look like by ripping it apart, I was hoping to slice a nice coronal section. I wanted to see a cross-sectional pattern.

Alas, it was not to be.

Photograph: Passion Fruit Opened 061617

Passion Fruit Opened

Robots in Love

Today’s composition began with a latex masking (frisket) design. I complied with my practice of the past few compositions, of  shaking my paper while the frisket was still wet, causing it to streak.  I dripped ink onto the paper in different places and blended those spots with watercolors.

I continually inspect the image that arises before me with each application of color. I modify the my choices of colors, as ideas occur to me. As the robots revealed themselves, I chose fields of colors that would accentuate them.

Watercolor and Ink: Abstract - Robots in Love 061517

Robots in Love
12″x9″ 140# Cold Pressed Watercolor Block

I like the relative formlessness of the robots and the almost electrical network of white space that seems to connect them.

Standpipe Shadow

I am ever on the look out for fire equipment sculptures. See Yellow Hydrant Sculpture, Red Standpipe, Colorful Fireplugs ,Fireplugs, the Beginning, Crosby Dog Graffiti, Open Hydrant, Camouflaged Fire Hydrant for previous sightings.

I saw this one on my morning walk.

Photograph: Standpipe Shadow 061317

Standpipe Shadow

Passion Fruit Still Lifes

I walked by the passion fruit vine again this morning. I couldn’t resist the delicate orange ovoid fruit, so I took a couple with me. In addition to its nearly perfect egg shape, its tendrils came very close to circumscribing perfect circles in the air (hard to see in the still life below, but it is at the top right on the stem).

Photograph: Passion Fruit Still Life 061417

Passion Fruit Ex Situ

Leaving the fruit on the glass table, I submerged my camera (aka phone) and activated the selfie lens.

This is my passion fruit selfie.

Photograph: Passion Fruit Selfie 061417

Passion Fruit Self Portrait

City Skeleton

I like working with the thin applications of masking frisket. The curved trajectory of the traces form regular beads of fluid, which become the source of intersections, when I jostle the paper from side to side.

After my frisket network dried, I dripped ink into its midst. I used sepia and blue inks. They mixed very well with the aureolin yellow, forming greens and greenish browns. Next came red ink, which yielded purples and oranges.

Watercolor and Ink: Abstract - City 061417

City Skeleton
12″x9″ 140# Cold Pressed Watercolor Block

I like the color distribution across the breadth of this composition. I’m also glad I stopped before muddiness ensued.

Passion Fruit Revisited

The passion fruit vine strangling the Japanese maple tree (see Mystery Flower) is a short distance from my house. The other day, the normal, green hue of the bushy vine was dotted with orange. On closer inspection, I saw that some of the fruit that had been green, were now orange.

Photograph: Passion Fruit in Stages of Ripeness 061317

Green, Yellow, Orange Passion Fruit

Here are a couple of ripe ones.

Photograph: Ripe Passion Fruit 061317

Ripe Passion Fruit

The curlicues are seeking something to grab, perhaps a branch of the Japanese maple.

I was expecting the fruit to be a tough-skinned solid, but it was surprisingly soft. It broke apart and I found this inside.

Photograph: Passion Fruit Insides 061317

Passion Fruit – Insides

I’ve never seen anything like it.  Ain’t nature grand?

Sea Scape Inspired by Paul Klee

I began this composition with a series of parallel lines that I drew free-handed. I was thinking of Paul Klee’s compositions that consist of adjacent strips of color. Some of his compositions are made up of seemingly random squares of colors, arrayed in parallel configurations.

I used the parallel lines as a skeleton on which to hang colors of the sea.

Seascape Inspired by Paul Klee 9″x9″ on 12″x9″ 140# Cold Pressed Watercolor Block

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